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People’s war – ICSPWI info – Soldier Of Paramilitary Force CRPF Killed In Jharkhand Maoist Encounter

A Central Reserve Police Force or CRPF soldier was killed in an encounter with maoists in the jungles of East Singhbhum district of Jharkhand today, a senior official said.
The encounter took place in Dalapani-Galudi axis of the district, he said.
The soldier belonged to the 193rd battalion of Central Reserve Police Force (CRPF), the official said.
According to the official, a joint team of the state police and CRPF was out for operations and an exchange of fire took place at about 9 am.
The constable rank soldier of the paramilitary force sustained bullet injuries and was killed on the spot, he said.
More details of the encounter are awaited, he added.

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CPI Maoist Beginning To Regain Strength And Influence In Kerala-Karnataka-Tamil Nadu Region

Wayanad (Kerala): The Kerala and Karnataka Police as well as intelligence agencies say there has been a strong Maoist resurgence in the Kerala-Karnataka-Tamil Nadu (KKT) region, in what could deal a blow to the Union government’s efforts to contain Left-wing extremism (LWE) in the country,

After a hiatus of nearly 12 years following the 2005 killing of Saketh, a Karnataka state committee member of the Communist Party of India (Maoist), the group has started making a comeback in the KKT tri-junction, according to an intelligence report reviewed by Mint.

“Currently the Western Ghat zonal committee is run by B.G Krishnamurthy and militarily supported by Vikram Gowda. Their main recruitment is from Karnataka and Chhattisgarh, but they prefer to stay in Kerala parts of Western Ghats. There have been sightings and four groups are operating in the Kerala side of Western Ghats,” the report said.
“In September 2017, five armed Maoist cadres forced their way into a house at Parappanpara in Kerala’s Kozhikode district. Having robbed the owner of basic supplies and food, they warned him against contacting the police, and fled. The next day, the Kerala Police embarked on a massive combing and search operation against the group in the nearby forest areas, only to find that the group had escaped without a trace,” said a senior Kerala Police official, seeking anonymity.
Though they could not be located, the team of Maoists (of that particular group) was led by Soman, who hails from Wayanad and is also a former leader of another Maoist front organization, the official added.
While the Kannadiga cadre of the Maoists has suffered a decline because of the gradual shift to Kerala, senior state police officials said that the southern tip of Karnataka, overlapping with Kerala and Tamil Nadu had become a safe haven for the CPI (Maoist) cadres who had begun to retreat from their current strongholds in the Andhra-Odisha border.
“To strengthen themselves, they are planning to develop morally, militarily and their organization capabilities. They are planning to train uneducated cadres by giving them both tactical and political education,” the aforementioned report said.
On 21 April 2017, the Kerala Police conducted another round of combing operations in the Nilambur Forest in Malappuram district after receiving reports of a Maoist group camping inside the forest and intelligence units in the state confirmed “that the group had planted landmines around their camp near the Mancheeri Tribal Colony, in an apparent bid to prevent police raids. A group of armed cadres had also warned the Mancheeri Colony residents of landmines and had asked them not to enter their camp area.”
Experts said that state borders were more porous, given lower levels of policing.
“State borders are less policed and so Naxal movement is easy there. But there needs to be more specific intelligence on their movement and where they will hit next,” said Gurmeet Kanwal, defence analyst at the Institute of Defence Studies and Analyses in New Delhi.

CPI Maoist Posters Found In Malkangiri District Denounce Local Police For Encouraging Hemp Farming

Malkangiri: After a few days lull red-fear loomed large again in Chitrakonda block of Malkangiri district on Sunday after a number of Maoist posters resurfaced at different places.
The posters were seen in Papluru and Kurmanur panchayats by some locals in the morning, who called up police and informed.
The posters released in the name of outlawed CPI (Maoist) group vehemently protested the ganja cultivation in the district. Accusing the Malkangiri Police of covertly patronizing the hemp growers in the district the rebels through their posters warned it of dire consequences in case it continues to do so.
“While the local police is taking Rs 1 lakh inducement from the hemp growers the amount stands at Rs 3 lakh at the district headquarters level. Similarly, the Excise Department officials are also taking a bribe of Rs 5 lakh from each ganja farmer. This practice should come to an end immediately and the district administration should encourage farmers in the area to grow paddy, finger millet and little millet instead,” read the Maoist posters.
Police had not reached the village till this report was being filed.

Freedom for the rights activist recently arrested!

Bengaluru

ICSPWI – italian workers and India campaign opens Spring Thunder Tour – new actions in the world in the next months – info csgpindia@Gmail.com

In the largest Steel Factory in Europe Ilva Taranto  Italy

Remembering comrade Azad

L'immagine può contenere: 1 persona
·
Remembering comrade Azad, his death Aniversary. last 5th of july.
It was not an encounter at all!! It was a cold blooded murder by the khaki clad fascist gangs of AP goverment.

ICSPWI calls maximum info and support between the writers, journalists, intellectuals people – info csgpindia@gmail.com

Stop the Genocide in India

Revolutionary Aadivasis and Maoists are Indian people

Writers Association RWA

Government waging war against the citizens is condemnable 
Police declared that an encounter took place between Police and Maoists on April 22nd at Indravati river bank in the region of Boriya and Kasansur in the district of Gadchiroli of Maharashtra. They announced that in that encounter 16 Maoists died. While on 24 of the month another 15 Maoists dead bodies were found floating in the Indravati River. They informed through media that on the whole 40 Maoists were dead. Even though the police have declared that it was an instance of cross firing, it is clear from the use of latest weapons by the C-60 commandos and CRPF forces that they surrounded and unleashed firing unilaterally.

This instance of police forces planned massacre killing in such a large number could be the first one in the history of modern India. In fact, we still don’t know how many have been killed in the massacre. Government killing its own people enmasse has become the cause of a great worry for the democrats across the country.
These kinds of instances have become a regular phenomenon in the Central India. Gadchiroli massacre also should be seen as part of the same larger agenda carried out in the Central India. The state and central governments are initiating these kinds of actions in a planned way with the aim of annihilating Aadivasis and Maoists as well. The civil society as well as rights organisations have stated that the instance is not an encounter as proclaimed by police but it is a unilateral firing opened by the police forces. Statement of the central home minister Rajnath Singh declared recently saying that for the annihilation of Maoists in Chattishgarh they are going to use air force (drones, helicopters and carpet bombing) reveals the impetus for the massacre in Gadchiroli. Carrying out the same agenda of curbing the to curb the Maoists movement, the central government brought all the policies implemented so far with the same aim under one roof as ‘Operation samdhan-2022′. They proclaimed that their aim is to root out the Maoist movement by 2022. From the other side of the Godavari river, Telangana government is also involved in drone and helicopter attacks on the Aadivasis living in the Godavari river belt in the name of ‘Rakshana corridor’.
This scenario of state violence and murders is spread and seen across the country. Gadchiroli SP, Avinash Deshmukh shamelessly spoke in a TV interview defending the mass killings without any fear of the democratic civil society. He told that ‘they will wipe out Maoists’ and declared that they ‘will not stop the ongoing war at any cost’. This is a depressing scenario. In essence, this is a problem related to the future of the democracy of the country. The heavily militarized governments attacking its own people is a threat to the democratic and civil rights of the people. It can also be observed that after the Gadchiroli encounter, many Aadivasis and revolutionaries are killed across the country in the name of encounters. At this juncture, we request every citizen of this country to protest the state killings and demand the governments to stop the murders. We appeal to international human rights organisations, democratic rights organisations, mass and progressive organisations and civil society at large to intervene in the scenario to stop the war on the Aadivasis of the country to safeguard the people’s right to life.

Revolutionary Writers Association
20. 5. 2018

Statements of PCI (Maoist) official

 

 

Protesting Arrest of Five Human Rights Activists – Citizens’ Solidarity with Voices of Democracy

June 25, 2018

Citizens’ Solidarity with Voices of Democracy

We condemn the arrest of five human rights activists, professors and lawyers in connection with the Bhima-Koregaon clashes early this year.

1. Abha Bhaiya, Jagori Rural, Himachal Pradesh and One Billion Rising
2. Abha Dev Habib, Miranda House, University of Delhi
3. Abhay Regi, Department of History, SOAS, London
4. Abhijnan Sarkar, editor, Towards a New Dawn and documentary filmmaker
5. Achin Vanaik, Retired Professor, International Relations and Global Politics, University of Delhi
6. Adil Jussawalla, poet, magazine editor and translator
7. Aditya Shekhar, Faculty of Law, University of Delhi

8. AK Ramakrishnan, School of International Studies, Jawaharlal Nehru University, Delhi
9. Alok Rai, former faculty, Department of English, University of Delhi and writer and translator
10. Alokananda, alumni, Tata Institute of Social Sciences, Hyderabad
11. Amandeep Kaur, Panjab University, Chandigarh
12. Amar Kanwar, filmmaker
13. Amit Bhaduri, Professor Emeritus, Jawaharlal Nehru University, Delhi
14. Amit Bhattacharyya, Professor, Jadavpur University and Secretary General, Committee for the Release of Political Prisoners (CRPP)
15. Anand Patwardhan, filmmaker
16. Anand Teltumbde, writer and General Secretary, Committee for the Protection of Democratic Rights (CPDR), Mumbai
17. Ananya Vajpeyi, fellow, Centre for Studies in Developing Societies (CSDS), Delhi
18. Aneeb PA, journalist
19. Anirban Kar, Associate Professor, Delhi School of Economics, University of Delhi
20. Ankit Grewal, advocate, Punjab and Haryana High Court, Chandigarh
21. Anu Arunima, Professor, Women’s Studies Department, Jawaharlal Nehru University, Delhi
22. Anubha Rana, School of Languages, Cultures and Linguistics, SOAS, London
23. Anubhuti Sharma, research scholar, School of Arts and Aesthetics, Jawaharlal Nehru University
24. Anupama Potluri, Hyderabad Central University, Hyderabad
25. Arijeet Mandal, Assistant Professor, Department of Film Studies, Jadavpur University, Kolkata
26. Arjun Sheoran, advocate, Punjab and Haryana High Court, Chandigarh
27. Arun Khopkar, director and actor
28. Ashok Bhowmick, artist
29. Asiya Shervani, Independent Consultant, Diversity and Social Inclusion, Hyderabad
30. Atamjit Singh, Punjabi playwright and Dakshinayan Abhiyan
31. Atul Dodiya, artist
32. Basavaraj Sulibhavi, activist and publisher of Ladai Prakashana, Karnataka
33. Benu Mohanlal, Ramjas College, University of Delhi
34. Bhupinder Choudhry, Maharaja Agrasen College, University of Delhi
35. Biswajit K. Bora, Syama Prasad Mukherjee College, University of Delh
36. Bittu Karthik Kondaiah, Associate Professor, Ashoka University, Sonipat and Telangana Hijra Intersex Transgender Samiti
37. Buta Singh Nawanshahr, Association for Democratic Rights, Punjab
38. C. Sadasiva, Dyal Singh College, University of Delhi
39. Chaman Lal, professor in Hindi translation at Jawaharlal Nehru University and Punjabi writer
40. Damodar Mauzo, Konkani writer and Sahitya Akademi awardee
41. Deachen Angmo, student, Tata Institute of Social Sciences, Mumbai
42. Debaditya Bhattacharya, Kazi Nazrul University, Asansol
43. Deepak Yatri, mime artist
44. Devika N Menon, School of Arts and Aesthetics, Jawaharlal Nehru University
45. Farhana Latief, research student, Jawaharlal Nehru University, Delhi
46. Feroze Mithiborwala, National Convenor, Bharat Bachao Andolan
47. Freny Manecksha, independent journalist,
48. G Haragopal, Visiting Professor, NLSIU, Bengaluru
49. Ganesh Devy, Dakshinayan Abhiyan
50. Gauhar Raza, former scientist, CSIR
51. Gauri Gill, contemporary photographer, Delhi
52. Ghanshyam Shah, social researcher, Ahmedabad
53. Githa Hariharan, writer
54. Govindi Joshi, Retd. Associate Professor, Ramjas College, University of Delhi
55. Hany Babu MT, Associate Professor, Department of English, University of Delhi
56. Hari Sen, Ramjas College, University of Delhi
57. Hemlata Manishwar, Professor, Jamia Millia Islamia
58. Himo Aronno, student, Jawaharlal Nehru University
59. Ila Ananya, journalist and student, Department of Gender Studies, SOAS, London
60. Imran G, Advocate, J & K High Court and Subordinate Courts
61. Indira Jaisingh, Advocate, Supreme Court of India
62. Isha Khandelwal, Advocate, Jagdalpur Legal Aid Group
63. Jagmohan Singh, Association for Democratic Rights (AFDR), Punjab
64. Janaki Nair, Professor, Centre for Historical Studies, Jawaharlal Nehru University, Delhi
65. Jatinder, Assistant Professor, Punjabi University
66. Jawari Mal Parakh, writer
67. Jhelum Roy, activist, Bastar Solidarity Network (Kolkata Chapter)
68. Jhuma Sen, OP Jindal Global University, Sonipat
69. John Dayal, human rights and political activist, Secretary-General, All India Christian Council
70. Jose Maria Sison, Chair, International League of People’s Struggle
71. Joyraj Bhattacharjee, theatre practitioner, Kolkata
72. Kalyani Menon Sen, feminist researcher and activist and Women against Sexual Violence and State Repression (WSS)
73. Kamayani Bali Mahabal, feminist and human rights activist, Mumbai
74. Kanji Patel, poet and novelist in Gujarati and editor of journal Vahi
75. Karuna DW, researcher, Chennai
76. Kavita Srivastava, President, Rajasthan chapter of People’s Union of Civil Liberties (PUCL), Jaipur
77. Keki Daruwalla, poet, writer and former IPS officer
78. Keval Arora, Kirori Mal College, University of Delhi
79. Kiran Nagarkar, novelist, playwright, film and drama critic and screenwriter in Marathi
80. Kiran Shaheen, independent journalist and Women against Sexual Violence and State Repression (WSS), Delhi
81. Krupa Desai, research student, Birkbeck, University of London
82. Laltu (Harjinder), Hyderabad
83. Laxmi Murthy, journalist, Bangalore
84. Loi, Global Secretariat, International Indigenous Peoples Movement for Self-Determination and Liberation (IPMSDL)
85. Madhu Bhaduri, former diplomat
86. Mala Dayal, author and editor
87. Malem Ningthouja, writer and Chairperson, Campaign for Peace and Democracy, Manipur (CPDM)
88. Manasi Pingle, Bangalore
89. Manshi Asher, activist, Himachal Pradesh
90. Marie Boti, International Women’s Alliance
91. Meena Kandasamy, poet, writer, translator and activist
92. Megha Pansare, Assistant professor and head, Department of Foreign Languages, Shivaji University, Kolhapur and District President, National Federation of Indian Women (NFIW)
93. MN Ravunni, Vice President, CRPP, Wayanad, Kerala
94. Mohan Rao, Retd. Professor, Jawaharlal Nehru University, Delhi
95. Monica Sabarwal, Assistant Professor, Punjabi University, Patiala
96. Mridula Garg, writer
97. Mrittika Biswas, MA Social Work, Tata Institute of Social Sciences, Mumbai
98. Mukul Kesavan, historian, novelist and essayist
99. Mukul Mangalik, Ramjas College, University of Delhi
100. N Raghuram, Professor and Dean, Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, Delhi
101. Nachikethas MJ, engineer
102. Nalini Nayak, Retd. Associate Professor, PGDAV (M) College, University of Delhi
103. Nancy Adajania, cultural theorist, art critic and curator
104. Nandakumar KN, activist, writer and freelance journalist
105. Nandini Chandra, Department of English, University of Delhi
106. Nandini Dutta, Associate Professor, Miranda House, University of Delhi
107. Nandini Sundar, Professor, Department of Sociology, Delhi School of Economics, University of Delhi
108. Nandita Narain, St. Stephens College, University of Delhi
109. Narender Thakur, B. R. Ambedkar College, University of Delhi
110. Naveen Gaur, Dyal Singh College, University of Delhi
111. Navsharan Singh, author and independent researcher
112. Neha Sonawane, advocate, Punjab and Haryana High Court, Chandigarh
113. Nikhil Jain, Dyal Singh College, University of Delhi
114. Nirmalangshu Mukerjee, Retd. Professor, Department of Philosophy, University of Delhi
115. Nisha Biswas, scientist and activist, Kolkata
116. Niti Saxena, feminist activist
117. Nivedita Menon, Professor, Centre for Comparative Politics and Political Theory, Jawaharlal Nehru University
118. P K Vijayan, Hindu College, University of Delhi
119. P. Koya, Professor, Calicut, Vice President, CRPP
120. Padma Velaskar, Retd. Professor, Tata Institute of Social Sciences, Mumbai
121. Padmakar Shaw, Retd, Professor, Journalism, Osmania University
122. Pankaj Tyagi, advocate, Punjab and Haryana High Court and People’s Union for Civil Rights, Haryana
123. Pargat Singh, teacher, GMSS Sector 26 Model, Chandigarh
124. Patricia Mukhim, social activist, writer, journalist and editor of Shillong Times
125. Paul Zacharia, short story writer, novelist and essayist in Malayalam
126. Pratik Sharma, student, University of Delhi
127. Prithvi, student, University of Delhi
128. Pulin Nayak, Retd. Professor, Department of Economics, University of Delhi
129. Pushpa Achanta, journalist and consultant, Bangalore
130. Radhika, lawyer and independent researcher
131. Rajeev Bhargava, political theorist, former director of CSDS and former professor at Jawaharlal Nehru University
132. Rajesh Azad, Lok Shikshak Manch, Delhi
133. Rajvinder Singh Bains, High Court advocate and human rights lawyer, Chandigarh
134. Rakesh Ranjan, Associate Professor, Shri Ram College of Commerce, University of Delhi
135. Ranbir Kaleka, contemporary multimedia artist
136. Ratna Raman, Sri Venketeswara College, University of Delhi
137. Ravinder Goel, Retd. Associate Professor, Satyawati College (E), University of Delhi
138. Ridhima Sharma, Centre for Women’s Studies, Jawaharlal Nehru University, Delhi
139. Rina Ramdev. Associate Professor, Sri Venkataswara College, University of Delhi
140. Rita Kothari, Ashoka University, Sonipat and author and translator
141. Rita Manchanda, writer and human rights activist
142. Rita Sinha, Janki Devi Memorial College, University of Delhi
143. Ritu Dewan, feminist economist and Director, Centre for Development Research and Action, Mumbai
144. Rohini Hensman, writer and independent scholar, Bombay
145. Roopa Dhawan, Ramjas College, University of Delhi
146. Rosemary Dzuvichu, Head, Department of English, Nagaland University, Kohima
147. Rossi D’Souza, Homi Bhabha Centre for Science Education, TIFR
148. Rudolf C. Heredia, Indian Social Institute, Delhi
149. Rukmini Bhaya Nair, linguist, poet, writer and critic
150. S Anand, publisher, Navayana
151. Saba Dewan, filmmaker
152. Sachin N, Dyal Singh College, University of Delhi
153. Sachinderpal Singh, editor, Mashaal
154. Sadhi Binning, Punjabi writer and activist, Canada
155. Sadhna Arya, Satyawati College, University of Delhi
156. Sagari Chhabra, writer and film director
157. Sagari R Ramdas, Veterinary Scientist and Member, Food Sovereignty Alliance India
158. Samantha Agarwal, PhD student, John Hopkins University
159. Samit Basu, writer
160. Samuel John, actor and cultural activist
161. Sananda Dasgupta, activist, Bastar Solidarity Network (Kolkata Chapter)
162. Sandeep, film editor and writer, Mumbai
163. Sandhya Devasan, Assistant Professor, Jesus and Mary College, University of Delhi
164. Sanjay Kak, filmmaker, Delhi
165. Sanjay Kumar, Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology, Mahatma Gandhi Central University, Motihari, Bihar
166. Sanjeev Kumar, writer and office-bearer, Janwadi Lekhak Sangh
167. SAR Geelani, Professor, Zakir Hussain College, University of Delhi and President, Committee for the Release of Political Prisoners (CRPP)
168. Saswati Ghosh, academic and activist, Women against Sexual Violence and State Repression, Kolkata
169. Satyam Varma, journalist
170. Seema Azad, writer, activist, editor of Dastak and Secretary, People’s Union for Civil Liberties (PUCL), Uttar Pradesh
171. Shabnam Hashmi, social activist
172. Shabnam Sengupta, Women against Sexual Violence and State Repression
173. Shafey Danish, Assistant Professor, KKM College, Munger University
174. Shailza, International Politics, SOAS, London
175. Shakeel Anjum, research student, School for International Studies, Jawaharlal Nehru University, Delhi
176. Shanta Gokhale, writer, translator, journalist and social critic
177. Shashank Kela, writer, Chennai
178. Shaswati Mazumdar, Professor, Department of Germanic and Romance Studies, University of Delhi
179. Sheba Chhachhi, photographer, activist, writer, filmmaker and artist, Delhi
180. Shefali Saini, student, Tata Institute of Social Sciences, Mumbai
181. Shinzani Jain, MA Sociology, Ambedkar University, Delhi
182. Shobhana Warrier, Kamala Nehru College, University of Delhi
183. Shovon Chowdhury, writer
184. Shreya K, Chhattisgarh
185. Shumona Goel, filmmaker, Bombay
186. Skand Priya, Assistant Professor, Shivaji College, University of Delhi
187. Sohini, activist, Jan Jagran Shakti Sanghathan, Bihar
188. Soumya Datta, South Asian University (SAU), Delhi
189. Sourav Banerjee, Jadavpur University, Kolkata
190. Srijani Kar, student, Department of Mathematics, University of Delhi
191. Sudha Bharadwaj, trade unionist and human rights lawyer
192. Sujato Bhadro, Vice President CRPP, Kolkata
193. Sukrita Paul Kumar, poet, critic, academician
194. Sumangala Damodaran, Associate Professor, Ambedkar University, Delhi
195. Sunil Kumar, Professor, Head, Department of History, University of Delhi
196. Surabhi Singh, freelance journalist
197. Susie Tharu, writer, professor, publisher, editor and activist
198. Suvojit Bagchi, journalist, Kolkata
199. Svati Joshi, Retd. Associate Professor, Miranda House, University of Delhi
200. Tamoghna Halder, PhD student, University of California, Davis
201. Tathagata Sengupta, Homi Bhabha Centre for Science Education, TIFR
202. Teena Anil, visiting fellow, Centre for the Study of Developing Societies, Delhi
203. Teesta Setalvad, civil rights activist, journalist and Secretary, Citizens for Justice and Peace (CJP)
204. TM Krishna, musician and author
205. Tultul Biswas, Madhya Pradesh Mahila Manch, Bhopal
206. Ujwal Punyark, Faculty of Law, University of Delhi
207. Ushmayo Dutta, University of Kashmir
208. Venugopalrao Nellutla, Editor, Veekshanam
209. Vidhya, student and activist, Women against Sexual Violence and State Repression (WSS)
210. Vidya Rao, Hindustani classical singer and writer
211. Vijay Singh, Retd. Associate Professor, Satyawati College, University of Delhi
212. Vijaya Venkarataraman, Associate Professor, Deparment of Germanic and Romance Studies, University of Delhi
213. Vijender Singh Chauhan, Zakir Hussain Delhi College, University of Delhi
214. Vikas Bajpai, Assistant Professor, Centre for Social Medicine and Community Health, Jawaharlal Nehru University, Delhi
215. Vikas Gupta, Assistant Professor, Department of History, University of Delhi, Joint Secretary, Sambhavana
216. Vineet Tiwari, National Secretary, All India Progressive Writer’s Association
217. Vineeta Bal, scientist, Pune
218. Vinita Chandra, Ramjas College, University of Delhi
219. Virginia Saldanha, Secretary, Indian Christian Women’s Movement, Mumbai
220. Vishnu Nagar, writer and poet
221. Vivek Narayanan, writer, poet and co-editor of Almost Island
222. Waseem RS, Secretary, Fraternity Movement
223. Windel Bolinget, Chairperson, Cordillera People’s Alliance and Co-Convenor of KATRIBU Kalinpunan ng mga Katutubong Mamamayan sa Pilipinas
224. Xavier Dias, former editor, Khan Kaneej aur Adhikar, Jharkhand
225. Yogesh Puri, Retd. Associate Professor, Kirori Mal College, University of Delhi
226. Yuvraj RS Singh, Law Student, Raipur
227. Zulaikha Jabeen, social activist, Delhi
(… More names are being added daily.)

We condemn the arrest of five human rights activists, professors and lawyers in connection with the Bhima-Koregaon clashes early this year.
The alarming arrest of Advocate and General Secretary of Indian Association of Peoples’ Lawyers (IAPL) Surendra Gadling, Committee for the Release of Political Prisoners (CRPP) Public Relations Secretary Rona Wilson, Head of English Department Professor Shoma Sen of Nagpur University and member of Women against Sexual Violence and State Repression (WSS), cultural activist and founder of Republican Panthers Jaatiya Antachi Chalwal Sudhir Dhawale and anti-displacement activist and Prime Ministers Rural Development Fellow (PMRDF) Mahesh Raut is a clear manifestation of state terror to crush the voices of dissent in this country.
The intemperate use of sections of the IPC and Unlawful Activities (Prevention) Act (UAPA) on all five reveals legal over-reach and exposes the desperation to foist extraordinary and excessive charges on all five to ensure they remain in the clutches of the Fadnavis-Maharashtra government. All the arrested have consistently worked for the assertion of oppressed and marginalised communities against majoritarian forces, spoken out against Brahmanical patriarchy, upheld peoples’ rights to land, life and dignity, and have strived for the release of political prisoners.
Today, after standing for the assertion of dalits, adivasis, Muslims, women, workers, farmers, marginalised sexualities, and oppressed communities, upholding the principles of democracy, and, consequently, being a thorn in the side of a vengeful police force, they are under the custody of impunity. Meanwhile, the perpetrators of violence during the Bhima-Koregaon clashes enjoy the protection of the state, patronage of the RSS and walk free. Now, with concerted efforts to implicate the arrested, egregious narratives of plots of assassinations is being weaved to defame and keep them in jail.
These retributive actions are intended to threaten anyone who speaks out for them and drive a wedge between all struggles for peoples’ rights. In the last few years, wherever people have asserted their rights, the political establishment has clamped down on them with brutal force – be it in Saharanpur or Una, Bhima-Koregaon or Thoothkudi. The assault on the democratic fabric of this country, through the abuse of the legal and judicial process, the stage-managing of media for public trials, and deliberate efforts to build a climate of fear is blatant and pervasive.
Today, more so than ever, it is crucial to reiterate unity in the face of divisive majoritarian politics that uses structural hierarchies to violently suppress different sections of people and communities. We strongly condemn the arrests of these voices of democracy, demand the immediate and unconditional release of all five human rights activists, professors and lawyers and stand united in our opposition to the onslaught of Brahmanical Hindutva fascism.
In Solidarity,
(Alphabetically)
1. Abha Bhaiya, Jagori Rural, Himachal Pradesh and One Billion Rising
2. Abha Dev Habib, Miranda House, University of Delhi
3. Abhay Regi, Department of History, SOAS, London
4. Abhijnan Sarkar, editor, Towards a New Dawn and documentary filmmaker
5. Achin Vanaik, Retired Professor, International Relations and Global Politics, University of Delhi
6. Adil Jussawalla, poet, magazine editor and translator
7. Aditya Shekhar, Faculty of Law, University of Delhi
8. AK Ramakrishnan, School of International Studies, Jawaharlal Nehru University, Delhi
9. Alok Rai, former faculty, Department of English, University of Delhi and writer and translator
10. Alokananda, alumni, Tata Institute of Social Sciences, Hyderabad
11. Amandeep Kaur, Panjab University, Chandigarh
12. Amar Kanwar, filmmaker
13. Amit Bhaduri, Professor Emeritus, Jawaharlal Nehru University, Delhi
14. Amit Bhattacharyya, Professor, Jadavpur University and Secretary General, Committee for the Release of Political Prisoners (CRPP)
15. Anand Patwardhan, filmmaker
16. Anand Teltumbde, writer and General Secretary, Committee for the Protection of Democratic Rights (CPDR), Mumbai
17. Ananya Vajpeyi, fellow, Centre for Studies in Developing Societies (CSDS), Delhi
18. Aneeb PA, journalist
19. Anirban Kar, Associate Professor, Delhi School of Economics, University of Delhi
20. Ankit Grewal, advocate, Punjab and Haryana High Court, Chandigarh
21. Anu Arunima, Professor, Women’s Studies Department, Jawaharlal Nehru University, Delhi
22. Anubha Rana, School of Languages, Cultures and Linguistics, SOAS, London
23. Anubhuti Sharma, research scholar, School of Arts and Aesthetics, Jawaharlal Nehru University
24. Anupama Potluri, Hyderabad Central University, Hyderabad
25. Arijeet Mandal, Assistant Professor, Department of Film Studies, Jadavpur University, Kolkata
26. Arjun Sheoran, advocate, Punjab and Haryana High Court, Chandigarh
27. Arun Khopkar, director and actor
28. Ashok Bhowmick, artist
29. Asiya Shervani, Independent Consultant, Diversity and Social Inclusion, Hyderabad
30. Atamjit Singh, Punjabi playwright and Dakshinayan Abhiyan
31. Atul Dodiya, artist
32. Basavaraj Sulibhavi, activist and publisher of Ladai Prakashana, Karnataka
33. Benu Mohanlal, Ramjas College, University of Delhi
34. Bhupinder Choudhry, Maharaja Agrasen College, University of Delhi
35. Biswajit K. Bora, Syama Prasad Mukherjee College, University of Delh
36. Bittu Karthik Kondaiah, Associate Professor, Ashoka University, Sonipat and Telangana Hijra Intersex Transgender Samiti
37. Buta Singh Nawanshahr, Association for Democratic Rights, Punjab
38. C. Sadasiva, Dyal Singh College, University of Delhi
39. Chaman Lal, professor in Hindi translation at Jawaharlal Nehru University and Punjabi writer
40. Damodar Mauzo, Konkani writer and Sahitya Akademi awardee
41. Deachen Angmo, student, Tata Institute of Social Sciences, Mumbai
42. Debaditya Bhattacharya, Kazi Nazrul University, Asansol
43. Deepak Yatri, mime artist
44. Devika N Menon, School of Arts and Aesthetics, Jawaharlal Nehru University
45. Farhana Latief, research student, Jawaharlal Nehru University, Delhi
46. Feroze Mithiborwala, National Convenor, Bharat Bachao Andolan
47. Freny Manecksha, independent journalist,
48. G Haragopal, Visiting Professor, NLSIU, Bengaluru
49. Ganesh Devy, Dakshinayan Abhiyan
50. Gauhar Raza, former scientist, CSIR
51. Gauri Gill, contemporary photographer, Delhi
52. Ghanshyam Shah, social researcher, Ahmedabad
53. Githa Hariharan, writer
54. Govindi Joshi, Retd. Associate Professor, Ramjas College, University of Delhi
55. Hany Babu MT, Associate Professor, Department of English, University of Delhi
56. Hari Sen, Ramjas College, University of Delhi
57. Hemlata Manishwar, Professor, Jamia Millia Islamia
58. Himo Aronno, student, Jawaharlal Nehru University
59. Ila Ananya, journalist and student, Department of Gender Studies, SOAS, London
60. Imran G, Advocate, J & K High Court and Subordinate Courts
61. Indira Jaisingh, Advocate, Supreme Court of India
62. Isha Khandelwal, Advocate, Jagdalpur Legal Aid Group
63. Jagmohan Singh, Association for Democratic Rights (AFDR), Punjab
64. Janaki Nair, Professor, Centre for Historical Studies, Jawaharlal Nehru University, Delhi
65. Jatinder, Assistant Professor, Punjabi University
66. Jawari Mal Parakh, writer
67. Jhelum Roy, activist, Bastar Solidarity Network (Kolkata Chapter)
68. Jhuma Sen, OP Jindal Global University, Sonipat
69. John Dayal, human rights and political activist, Secretary-General, All India Christian Council
70. Jose Maria Sison, Chair, International League of People’s Struggle
71. Joyraj Bhattacharjee, theatre practitioner, Kolkata
72. Kalyani Menon Sen, feminist researcher and activist and Women against Sexual Violence and State Repression (WSS)
73. Kamayani Bali Mahabal, feminist and human rights activist, Mumbai
74. Kanji Patel, poet and novelist in Gujarati and editor of journal Vahi
75. Karuna DW, researcher, Chennai
76. Kavita Srivastava, President, Rajasthan chapter of People’s Union of Civil Liberties (PUCL), Jaipur
77. Keki Daruwalla, poet, writer and former IPS officer
78. Keval Arora, Kirori Mal College, University of Delhi
79. Kiran Nagarkar, novelist, playwright, film and drama critic and screenwriter in Marathi
80. Kiran Shaheen, independent journalist and Women against Sexual Violence and State Repression (WSS), Delhi
81. Krupa Desai, research student, Birkbeck, University of London
82. Laltu (Harjinder), Hyderabad
83. Laxmi Murthy, journalist, Bangalore
84. Loi, Global Secretariat, International Indigenous Peoples Movement for Self-Determination and Liberation (IPMSDL)
85. Madhu Bhaduri, former diplomat
86. Mala Dayal, author and editor
87. Malem Ningthouja, writer and Chairperson, Campaign for Peace and Democracy, Manipur (CPDM)
88. Manasi Pingle, Bangalore
89. Manshi Asher, activist, Himachal Pradesh
90. Marie Boti, International Women’s Alliance
91. Meena Kandasamy, poet, writer, translator and activist
92. Megha Pansare, Assistant professor and head, Department of Foreign Languages, Shivaji University, Kolhapur and District President, National Federation of Indian Women (NFIW)
93. MN Ravunni, Vice President, CRPP, Wayanad, Kerala
94. Mohan Rao, Retd. Professor, Jawaharlal Nehru University, Delhi
95. Monica Sabarwal, Assistant Professor, Punjabi University, Patiala
96. Mridula Garg, writer
97. Mrittika Biswas, MA Social Work, Tata Institute of Social Sciences, Mumbai
98. Mukul Kesavan, historian, novelist and essayist
99. Mukul Mangalik, Ramjas College, University of Delhi
100. N Raghuram, Professor and Dean, Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, Delhi
101. Nachikethas MJ, engineer
102. Nalini Nayak, Retd. Associate Professor, PGDAV (M) College, University of Delhi
103. Nancy Adajania, cultural theorist, art critic and curator
104. Nandakumar KN, activist, writer and freelance journalist
105. Nandini Chandra, Department of English, University of Delhi
106. Nandini Dutta, Associate Professor, Miranda House, University of Delhi
107. Nandini Sundar, Professor, Department of Sociology, Delhi School of Economics, University of Delhi
108. Nandita Narain, St. Stephens College, University of Delhi
109. Narender Thakur, B. R. Ambedkar College, University of Delhi
110. Naveen Gaur, Dyal Singh College, University of Delhi
111. Navsharan Singh, author and independent researcher
112. Neha Sonawane, advocate, Punjab and Haryana High Court, Chandigarh
113. Nikhil Jain, Dyal Singh College, University of Delhi
114. Nirmalangshu Mukerjee, Retd. Professor, Department of Philosophy, University of Delhi
115. Nisha Biswas, scientist and activist, Kolkata
116. Niti Saxena, feminist activist
117. Nivedita Menon, Professor, Centre for Comparative Politics and Political Theory, Jawaharlal Nehru University
118. P K Vijayan, Hindu College, University of Delhi
119. P. Koya, Professor, Calicut, Vice President, CRPP
120. Padma Velaskar, Retd. Professor, Tata Institute of Social Sciences, Mumbai
121. Padmakar Shaw, Retd, Professor, Journalism, Osmania University
122. Pankaj Tyagi, advocate, Punjab and Haryana High Court and People’s Union for Civil Rights, Haryana
123. Pargat Singh, teacher, GMSS Sector 26 Model, Chandigarh
124. Patricia Mukhim, social activist, writer, journalist and editor of Shillong Times
125. Paul Zacharia, short story writer, novelist and essayist in Malayalam
126. Pratik Sharma, student, University of Delhi
127. Prithvi, student, University of Delhi
128. Pulin Nayak, Retd. Professor, Department of Economics, University of Delhi
129. Pushpa Achanta, journalist and consultant, Bangalore
130. Radhika, lawyer and independent researcher
131. Rajeev Bhargava, political theorist, former director of CSDS and former professor at Jawaharlal Nehru University
132. Rajesh Azad, Lok Shikshak Manch, Delhi
133. Rajvinder Singh Bains, High Court advocate and human rights lawyer, Chandigarh
134. Rakesh Ranjan, Associate Professor, Shri Ram College of Commerce, University of Delhi
135. Ranbir Kaleka, contemporary multimedia artist
136. Ratna Raman, Sri Venketeswara College, University of Delhi
137. Ravinder Goel, Retd. Associate Professor, Satyawati College (E), University of Delhi
138. Ridhima Sharma, Centre for Women’s Studies, Jawaharlal Nehru University, Delhi
139. Rina Ramdev. Associate Professor, Sri Venkataswara College, University of Delhi
140. Rita Kothari, Ashoka University, Sonipat and author and translator
141. Rita Manchanda, writer and human rights activist
142. Rita Sinha, Janki Devi Memorial College, University of Delhi
143. Ritu Dewan, feminist economist and Director, Centre for Development Research and Action, Mumbai
144. Rohini Hensman, writer and independent scholar, Bombay
145. Roopa Dhawan, Ramjas College, University of Delhi
146. Rosemary Dzuvichu, Head, Department of English, Nagaland University, Kohima
147. Rossi D’Souza, Homi Bhabha Centre for Science Education, TIFR
148. Rudolf C. Heredia, Indian Social Institute, Delhi
149. Rukmini Bhaya Nair, linguist, poet, writer and critic
150. S Anand, publisher, Navayana
151. Saba Dewan, filmmaker
152. Sachin N, Dyal Singh College, University of Delhi
153. Sachinderpal Singh, editor, Mashaal
154. Sadhi Binning, Punjabi writer and activist, Canada
155. Sadhna Arya, Satyawati College, University of Delhi
156. Sagari Chhabra, writer and film director
157. Sagari R Ramdas, Veterinary Scientist and Member, Food Sovereignty Alliance India
158. Samantha Agarwal, PhD student, John Hopkins University
159. Samit Basu, writer
160. Samuel John, actor and cultural activist
161. Sananda Dasgupta, activist, Bastar Solidarity Network (Kolkata Chapter)
162. Sandeep, film editor and writer, Mumbai
163. Sandhya Devasan, Assistant Professor, Jesus and Mary College, University of Delhi
164. Sanjay Kak, filmmaker, Delhi
165. Sanjay Kumar, Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology, Mahatma Gandhi Central University, Motihari, Bihar
166. Sanjeev Kumar, writer and office-bearer, Janwadi Lekhak Sangh
167. SAR Geelani, Professor, Zakir Hussain College, University of Delhi and President, Committee for the Release of Political Prisoners (CRPP)
168. Saswati Ghosh, academic and activist, Women against Sexual Violence and State Repression, Kolkata
169. Satyam Varma, journalist
170. Seema Azad, writer, activist, editor of Dastak and Secretary, People’s Union for Civil Liberties (PUCL), Uttar Pradesh
171. Shabnam Hashmi, social activist
172. Shabnam Sengupta, Women against Sexual Violence and State Repression
173. Shafey Danish, Assistant Professor, KKM College, Munger University
174. Shailza, International Politics, SOAS, London
175. Shakeel Anjum, research student, School for International Studies, Jawaharlal Nehru University, Delhi
176. Shanta Gokhale, writer, translator, journalist and social critic
177. Shashank Kela, writer, Chennai
178. Shaswati Mazumdar, Professor, Department of Germanic and Romance Studies, University of Delhi
179. Sheba Chhachhi, photographer, activist, writer, filmmaker and artist, Delhi
180. Shefali Saini, student, Tata Institute of Social Sciences, Mumbai
181. Shinzani Jain, MA Sociology, Ambedkar University, Delhi
182. Shobhana Warrier, Kamala Nehru College, University of Delhi
183. Shovon Chowdhury, writer
184. Shreya K, Chhattisgarh
185. Shumona Goel, filmmaker, Bombay
186. Skand Priya, Assistant Professor, Shivaji College, University of Delhi
187. Sohini, activist, Jan Jagran Shakti Sanghathan, Bihar
188. Soumya Datta, South Asian University (SAU), Delhi
189. Sourav Banerjee, Jadavpur University, Kolkata
190. Srijani Kar, student, Department of Mathematics, University of Delhi
191. Sudha Bharadwaj, trade unionist and human rights lawyer
192. Sujato Bhadro, Vice President CRPP, Kolkata
193. Sukrita Paul Kumar, poet, critic, academician
194. Sumangala Damodaran, Associate Professor, Ambedkar University, Delhi
195. Sunil Kumar, Professor, Head, Department of History, University of Delhi
196. Surabhi Singh, freelance journalist
197. Susie Tharu, writer, professor, publisher, editor and activist
198. Suvojit Bagchi, journalist, Kolkata
199. Svati Joshi, Retd. Associate Professor, Miranda House, University of Delhi
200. Tamoghna Halder, PhD student, University of California, Davis
201. Tathagata Sengupta, Homi Bhabha Centre for Science Education, TIFR
202. Teena Anil, visiting fellow, Centre for the Study of Developing Societies, Delhi
203. Teesta Setalvad, civil rights activist, journalist and Secretary, Citizens for Justice and Peace (CJP)
204. TM Krishna, musician and author
205. Tultul Biswas, Madhya Pradesh Mahila Manch, Bhopal
206. Ujwal Punyark, Faculty of Law, University of Delhi
207. Ushmayo Dutta, University of Kashmir
208. Venugopalrao Nellutla, Editor, Veekshanam
209. Vidhya, student and activist, Women against Sexual Violence and State Repression (WSS)
210. Vidya Rao, Hindustani classical singer and writer
211. Vijay Singh, Retd. Associate Professor, Satyawati College, University of Delhi
212. Vijaya Venkarataraman, Associate Professor, Deparment of Germanic and Romance Studies, University of Delhi
213. Vijender Singh Chauhan, Zakir Hussain Delhi College, University of Delhi
214. Vikas Bajpai, Assistant Professor, Centre for Social Medicine and Community Health, Jawaharlal Nehru University, Delhi
215. Vikas Gupta, Assistant Professor, Department of History, University of Delhi, Joint Secretary, Sambhavana
216. Vineet Tiwari, National Secretary, All India Progressive Writer’s Association
217. Vineeta Bal, scientist, Pune
218. Vinita Chandra, Ramjas College, University of Delhi
219. Virginia Saldanha, Secretary, Indian Christian Women’s Movement, Mumbai
220. Vishnu Nagar, writer and poet
221. Vivek Narayanan, writer, poet and co-editor of Almost Island
222. Waseem RS, Secretary, Fraternity Movement
223. Windel Bolinget, Chairperson, Cordillera People’s Alliance and Co-Convenor of KATRIBU Kalinpunan ng mga Katutubong Mamamayan sa Pilipinas
224. Xavier Dias, former editor, Khan Kaneej aur Adhikar, Jharkhand
225. Yogesh Puri, Retd. Associate Professor, Kirori Mal College, University of Delhi
226. Yuvraj RS Singh, Law Student, Raipur
227. Zulaikha Jabeen, social activist, Delhi
(… More names are being added daily.)

Public Lynching in Different Parts of the Country – Modi style government, state, culture

July 4, 2018

Press Release
27, June 2018
Isolate and Defeat Perpetrators of Lynching: A Lynching Nation Cannot be Democratic!
PADS statement against recent cases of public lynching in different parts of the country
The seven day period from 13th June to 20th June, 2018 saw four Muslim men lynched at Hapur (UP) and at Godda and Ramgarh in Jharkhand. The last four years of BJP rule at center have seen steep rise in the numbers communally motivated lynching, with cow protection being the most common excuse.  Lynching, which means killing of individuals by mobs, is a public crime. However, it is not listed as a separate crime under the IPC. Hence, information about it can be gained only from media and fact finding reports.According to an analysis of media report by web portal India Spend, 25 Indians were killed in 60 cow related violent incidences between 2010 and 2017. Ninety seven percent of these incidences were reported after Modi govt came to power in 2014, and 84% percent of those killed were Muslim.

A July 2017 report from Observer Research Foundation found a sharp increase in cow related violent incidences among total cases of mob violence. These incidences rose from less than 5% of cases of mob violence in 2012, to more than 20% by June 2017. During 2018 so far, besides lynching of Muslims mentioned above, one person was killed by villagers nearSatna (MP) on 17 May, and another went into coma following serious injuries suffered during the attack. Both were accused of killing cows. In this hideously dark scenario of threat to the life of Muslim citizens, perhaps the only bright spot wasSub Inspector Gagandeep Singh of Ramnagar, Uttarakhand,who at grave risk to his own life saved a young Muslim man on 22 May this year from a crowd baying for his blood and shouting slogans against love jihad.
Lynching has become an important tool of Hindutva popular politics. In many cases of lynching, locally organized cow protection groups take the lead and incite mob violence against hapless victims. Hate filled messages fabricated with lies are spread on social media to gather crowds. Police is a passive accomplice, and in most cases criminal cases are filed against victims themselves under cow protection laws.
The increased lynching of minorities in the last four years is closely related to local level Hindutva organizing and a supportive state power. However, it needs to be underlined that even without these two factors, individuals and communities in India face lot of violence which enjoys passive, or active public approval. Dalits have been facing caste violence for thousands of years. Even now, despite constitutional provisions many of them face every day public humiliation.Massacres of Dalits by gangs of caste Hindus at Kilevenmani, BathaniTola, Laxmanpur Bathe, and Khairlanji are among the darkest spots in post independence Indian history. More recently, at Una in 2016 four Dalit youth skinning dead cattle were publicly beaten by a cow protection gang, and the video recording of the beating was widely shared as a proof of just punishment.
Brutal ethnic violence against outsiders is prevalent in many parts of the country. In March 2015, a large crowd broke open the central prison in Dimapur, Nagaland, dragged out a non-Naga man accused of raping a local woman, killed him and put his body in the town center.Indian youth face violence from their families due to choices they make in their personal life.Reply to a question in Parliament in the monsoon session of 2017 mentioned 288 cases of honour killing between 2014 and 2016.
While the lynching of minorities is largely political, and caste and ethnic violence and honour killings are social systemic, another kind of public violence often leading to lynching appears random and spontaneous. Since the beginning of the year incidences of such lynching have taken place in states like Tamil Nadu, Andhra Pradesh, Telangana and Asom, which otherwise show little evidence of communal lynching. The most common excuse is suspicion of child abduction. Allegations of petty theft, witch craft, etc. are other reasons cited. Adivasis, mentally disturbed persons, migrant workers, single women and even tourists have been targeted. One media report(at boomlive.in) lists 13 dead due lynching in such cases in the first half of 2018.Such violence is treated just a crime by state authorities. In reality, its prevalence all over India is a symptom of a deep social malaise. It indicates a very low level of opposition to violence per se in our society.
All decent human beings feel revulsion against lynching of a fellow being. However, an appropriate social corrective and a political response are also important. Democracy is not possible in a society which accepts mass violence as a norm. The first condition of democracy is respect for basic rights of all citizens, which involve no bodily harm to anyone, except in special circumstances and after a due process. On the other hand, a society which accepts different kinds of social systemic and random violence as routine, can become an easy prey to Fascism. Fascism is anti-democratic precisely because it does not accept the first condition of democracy, and uses violence as a political tool against selected social and political groups. If fascism is made easy by mass acceptance of violence, its success legitimizes violence and further lowers the threshold level of acceptance of violence. Hence, societies under fascism can get sucked into a vicious cycle of increasing public violence.
Since the political successes of BJP under Modi, India is witnessing not only a degradation of institutions of democratic governance, but also degradation of public morals. The more people show acceptance of Modi style aggressive bravado and blatant use of lies and abuse in public discourse, more they becomeinsensitive to others; and then they also become more likely to turn into brutes at any opportunity of lynching. People of India need to be vigilant against the deadly embrace of communal fascist politics and a lynching culture.
P.A.D.S. calls upon all Indians to stand up against any attempt at lynching and mass violence. Political parties and social organisations should make special efforts to prevent incidences of public violence.  Mass campaigns, especially involving youth and students should be started against culture of violence.
P.A.D.S. demands that all ‘cow protection’ gangs involved in terrorizing and lynching citizens belonging to minority communities and Dalits be banned. Cow protection laws which give a legal fig leaf to such gangs should be repealed all over India.Police and Courts should take an unambiguous stand against lynching and perpetrators punished at the earliest.
State should recognize specific threat to public safety from lynching and mass violence against individuals. As in the case of sexual violence, a special law should be made against lynching and given wide publicity to make people aware of legal punishments.
Released by People’s Alliance for Democracy and Secularism (PADS)
Battini Rao, Convenor PADS (95339 75195, battini.rao@gmail.com)

Important CPI (Maoist) documents

"Against Proposed Aerial Attacks on Adivasi Areas"

Red Homage to CPI(Maoist) Central Committee member Comrade Sridhar Srinivasan!

“The closure of three thousand schools and ashrams by the CG government is a symbol of the economic and academic bankruptcy and its anti people character”

“In Support of the Australian Indigenous Peoples’ Struggle Against Adani”

“Rise Against the Proposed Salva Judum-2 with the name Vikas Sangharsh Samithi (Committee to Struggle for Development)! — An appeal to the people, democrats, progressive intellectuals, writers, teachers, lawyers, media personnel, human rights organizations, adivasi, non-adivasi social organizations, sarv samaj, sarv adivasi samaj”

“A Call to the People to Fight Back the New Form of Salva Judum and the Supportive Organization of Greenhunt, Salva Judum-2”

“Boycott the Visit of Modi, the Prime Servant of CBB and MNCs to Chhattisgarh”

“Against the Family Planning Murders of Women”

“Condemn the Limitation on Buying Paddy”, in support of the peasant’s struggle

“Against Harrakoder Fake Encounter"

MIB Interview with Comrade Ganapathy: “Building on the new, unique and unprecedented achievements of the last decade, Indian revolution will certainly overcome the difficult situation to win newer, larger and more glorious victories”

Unite, Fight Back and Defeat ‘OGH—Third Phase’ of the Fascist Modi Government

Fight Back [against] the Anti-Working Class Amendments to Labour Laws by the NDA Goverment! Vikas model of Modi is Vinash for the people of India and Vistar for the imperialists and compradors!

CC Collected Statements: Volume 1 (September 2004 - February 2007)

CC Collected Statements: Volume 2 (March 2007 - July 2010)

CC Collected Statements: Volume 3 (August 2010 - August 2014)

Collected Interviews — September 2004 - August 2014

Message to the Milan International Conference in Solidarity with the People’s War in India

A Call to the People of India! Shatter the shackles of imperialism and feudalism, Destroy this rotten system! Build your future and that of the country with your own hands!

Statement in celebration of the 10th anniversary of the founding of the Communist Party of India (Maoist) on September 21, 2004, issued by the Odisha State Committee of the CPI (Maoist) -Hindi

Pamphlet in celebration of the 10th anniversary of the founding of the Communist Party of India (Maoist) on September 21, 2004, issued by the Odisha State Committee of the CPI (Maoist) -Hindi

Condemn the Invasion of Gaza and Massacre of Palestinians by Zionist Israel! Hail the Heroic National Liberation Struggle for Independent Palestine!

Pamphlet and in honor of Com. Barunda (Sushil Roy), put out by the Odisha State Committee of the CPI (Maoist) -Hindi

Jan Sangram Issue4 July 2014 -Hindi

CC CPI(Maoist) Statement on the Lok Sabha Election Results

Jan Sangram 2014 March - Special Election Boycott Issue -Hindi

Jan Sangram, 2014 Pamphlet On International Day Of Support -Hindi

Tongpal Ambush is the Consequence of White Terrorism of the Indian State in the name of Operation Green Hunt — ‘War on the People

Merger Declaration of the CPI(Maoist) and CPI(M-L)Naxalbari

Boycott the sham parliament & assembly elections!

Comrade Abhay Interview on General Elections — 2014

Condolence Message of the CC, CPI(Maoist) on the Demise of Comrade S. A. Rauf

The message for the International Conference in Hamburg by the Secretary, CPI(Maoist)

The Call of the CC, CPI(Maoist) to celebrate the 9° anniversary of the Party

On the PLGA Attack of May 25

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